<source id="3oodw" ><sup id="3oodw" ></sup></source>

      1. <s id="3oodw" ><th id="3oodw" ><small id="3oodw" ></small></th></s>
        <i id="3oodw" ><optgroup id="3oodw" ></optgroup></i>

            <input id="3oodw" ><bdo id="3oodw" ><cite id="3oodw" ></cite></bdo></input>
            <delect id="3oodw" ><ruby id="3oodw" ></ruby></delect>

            <em id="3oodw" ><progress id="3oodw" ></progress></em><input id="3oodw" ></input>
            <strike id="3oodw" ></strike>

            Distribution of Tax Benefits and Liabilities

            In dissolution cases, many of the assets that are distributed have embedded tax liabilities or benefits that need to be identified and considered as part of the overall case strategy, whether the case is on a settlement or a trial path.  The embedded taxes can take many forms and, if they are not considered, the division of marital assets could be implemented in a way that is inefficient and/or unfair.

            Due to the importance of the tax considerations in high net worth divorces, the attorneys at Fisher Potter Hodas PL have written scholarly articles identifying and explaining these issues for practitioners. For example, in 2014, attorneys ), published an article in the Florida Bar Journal entitled, "Tax Consequences of Distributing Equity Compensation Rights in Divorce." Prior to that, in 2010, Jeffrey Fisher published an article entitled, "Beyond the Imminent Sale Doctrine: Valuing Assets with Embedded Tax Consequences."